Letter from the Chair

AES Chair Juan Guerra
AES Chair Juan Guerra

As I come to the end of my third year as AES Chair, I am pleased to inform you that Dean Robert Stacey asked me to continue in the position for two more years—and I gladly accepted. Serving as AES Chair has been one of the highlights of my 45 years in academia, and working with faculty, staff and students in the department has been a joy that I will always cherish. In the past year, we experienced a few setbacks that I have no doubt we will bounce back from, one of the more challenging being a loss of the funding that has made it possible for us to hire someone to write, edit and produce our newsletter, All Eyes on AES. On behalf of everyone in AES, I want to thank Olivia Hernández for all the hard work she put into making the newsletter a reality over the last three years in the midst of teaching her classes, taking her PhD exams, and working on her dissertation.

Beginning with this one, we will be producing a single end of the year issue of the newsletter in place of the two we had been producing in the past. We will of course continue to make every effort to keep you informed about the celebratory moments we find the most authentic manifestation of our commitment to a future that beckons and asks us to remember who we are and where we are going. There are so many stories worth telling about AES, and we will miss not being able to tell more of them. I am grateful that Lorna Hamill, our very capable academic adviser in AES, has agreed to work with me to continue collecting stories, interviewing faculty, staff and students, and producing All Eyes on AES beginning this coming autumn.

Once again, the current issue is filled with the diverse activities and multiple accomplishments of AES faculty, staff and students that we are proud to share with you. So, please, join us in reading an array of stories about Dr. Alina Méndez, a new professor in Chicana/o Studies who will be joining the department in September, AES alumnus Hork Do’s acceptance into the UW doctoral program in physical therapy, and Professor Emeritus Erasmo Gamboa’s sneak preview of the brand new Sea Mar Museum of Chicano/a and Latino/a Culture scheduled to open in October. In addition, meet three AES students—Thien-Tu Lien, Katrina Salazar Punzalan and Dylan Tran—who were inducted into the Husky 100, get to know two AES faculty members—Professors Linh Nguyễn and Jang Wook Huh—who just completed their first year in the department, and learn about the new Minor in Oceania Studies that Professor Rick Bonus helped launch. Finally, check out the Real Black Grandmothers website developed by Professor LaShawnDa Pittman, the incredible honor that Professor Emeritus Tetsuden Kashima received from the Consul General of Japan in March and the outstanding work that Lorna Hamill, our new academic adviser, has done in her effort to empower AES students. This issue of the newsletter would not be complete without a story about our recent AES graduation celebration where we honored AES students who completed their bachelor’s degrees as well as their family, friends, faculty and mentors who supported them in their many endeavors.

These are only a few examples of the meaningful contributions that our faculty, staff and students have made this year. Together, these stories provide a glimpse into the rich possibilities that play themselves out in AES every single day. Keep in mind that we also want to hear your stories—whether you’re AES alumni, friends, current students or community partners—so that we can join you in celebrating and sharing your accomplishments in a future installment of All Eyes on AES. So, please, stay in touch and let us know what you’re up to by emailing us at aes@uw.edu. In the meantime, enjoy reading the stories in this issue and join us in working to forge new connections as we continue to strengthen the many bonds we already share.

Juan Guerra

 

Note: To access previous issues of the newsletter, click here:

Summer 2017

Winter 2017

Spring 2016

Winter 2016

Spring 2015

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